© Maggie Kilbey & Marcel Glover 2021-2022
St Nicholas, North Lopham (Norfolk)
Barrel Organs in English Parish Churches
Barrel & finger organ. The builder’s nameplate and label on the barrel read ‘J. C. BISHOP, Organ Builder. By APPOINTMENT TO HIS MAJESTY, Lisson Grove South, New Road, St MaryleBone, INVENTOR OF THE COMPOSITION PEDALS.’ It is thought that an old nameplate was used, Queen Victoria having come to the throne in 1837, some eight years before this organ was built, and the tunes include ‘God Save the Queen’. According to Canon Noel Boston the organ was converted from a barrel organ. In 1953 it was removed from Stanhoe Hall and installed here by W. & A. Boggis of Diss. The barrel mechanism is operated from the front. The oak case has five panels of gold painted dummy pipes. One barrel x 10 tunes, corresponding with the original handwritten tunelist pasted to the casework. Presumably ‘God Save the Queen’ was used as a voluntary - it would be difficult to sing to this version since both halves of the tune are repeated: neither should be.
References: Norfolk Record Office, PD338/13 Churchwardens' accounts; Diss Express (17 Apr. 1953), p. 6; Boston (1959) Boston & Langwill (1967); Turner (2002); NPOR N06470.
© Maggie Kilbey & Marcel Glover 2021-2022
Barrel Organs in English Parish Churches
St Nicholas, North Lopham (Norfolk)
Barrel & finger organ. The builder’s nameplate and label on the barrel read ‘J. C. BISHOP, Organ Builder. By APPOINTMENT TO HIS MAJESTY, Lisson Grove South, New Road, St MaryleBone, INVENTOR OF THE COMPOSITION PEDALS.’ It is thought that an old nameplate was used, Queen Victoria having come to the throne in 1837, some eight years before this organ was built, and the tunes include ‘God Save the Queen’. According to Canon Noel Boston the organ was converted from a barrel organ. In 1953 it was removed from Stanhoe Hall and installed here by W. & A. Boggis of Diss. The barrel mechanism is operated from the front. The oak case has five panels of gold painted dummy pipes. One barrel x 10 tunes, corresponding with the original handwritten tunelist pasted to the casework. Presumably ‘God Save the Queen’ was used as a voluntary - it would be difficult to sing to this version since both halves of the tune are repeated: neither should be.
References: Norfolk Record Office, PD338/13 Churchwardens' accounts; Diss Express (17 Apr. 1953), p. 6; Boston (1959) Boston & Langwill (1967); Turner (2002); NPOR N06470.